Resource Management Guiding Principles Current vs. Zero Waste v1.0   Current policy vs ZERO WASTE policy

“Green” Plastics at a Glance: Green plastics, or bioplastics, refers to plastic materials and products that are either: Biodegradable, made wholly or partly from biological materials, or both. The market was until recently dominated by biodegradable materials, but bio-based, non-biodegradable plastics have grown in a big way, and now make up about 58 percent of global production capacity. These materials appeal to customers because they can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, avoid depleting fossil resources, and reduce landfill volumes. They can be used for a wide variety of purposes, including both disposable and durable goods, and ongoing innovation promises great growth for the industry.

Best disposal option for the “Leftovers” on the way to Zero Waste: This report considers a pre-processing scenario called Material Recovery, Biological Treatment to emphasize the recovery of recyclable materials in the process.

Garbage Incineration has become a major issue for British Columbia

This short video asks for your support!

Reality Check for Local Government Zero Waste to Landfill InitiativesThis dissertation, by Robert Krausz, presents that despite local governments worldwide having declared Zero Waste to Landfill goals with specific deadlines; none of have proven successful. He argues that this failure is due to: governments not recognizing the magnitude of the task; an absence of strategies for addressing waste upstream; insufficient downstream measures such as recycling; and a consistent preference for technical solutions over fundamental behaviour change. He concludes that 100% diversion requires unprecedented support and commitment from higher levels of government, industry and the public, where greater control over the top-of-pipe currently resides.

Zero Waste Hierarchy of Highest and Best UseThis PDF summarizes the Zero Waste Hierarchy as developed by Zero Waste International Alliance and is supported by Zero Waste Canada. :

 

Market-based Zero-Waste Strategic Plan Hierarchy (2) The strategy follows 14 basic sequential steps which need to be followed carefully to assure success. It is important to stress that developing Zero Waste is a building process in which one needs to follow basic foundational steps. One should not expect to achieve desired targets if one omits key foundational steps.  Thus, one should not expect to develop a successful Zero Waste facility if one merely constructs or designs a facility, without having first carried out a full market assessment to understand and meet the communities needs and expectations.

Presentations

25 Years of Waste Management in Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain

Time to Brush Up On History  : In this presentation,Lluís Amengual outlines why the current linear model of waste management is unsustainable.

Report on incinerator presentation before conference of Canadian municipal officials
by Mike Ewall, Energy Justice Network & Zero Waste Canada
 :On Feb 12th, 2015,Mike Ewall of Energy Justice and Zero Waste Canada presented at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Sustainable Communities Conference in London, Ontario.  It was the first time they held a panel to present both sides of a polarized issue.  The session was well-attended and well-promoted.  It was titled “The Two Sided Coin: Navigating Through Polarized Perspectives.”  Without any mention of incineration in the title, that’s what the entire panel was about.  The organizers recruited hard and got about 90-some people to attend, many of them local government officials from throughout Canada.  Many attended, not knowing it was all about incineration, and got quite an education.

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Why Zero Waste
David Suzuki Foundation. (n.d.). The problems with carbon offsets from tree-planting.

Greenpeace. (n.d.). Forests – threats. Retrieved from http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/campaigns/forests/threats/

Leonard, Annie. (2010). The Story of Stuff. Free Press. New York.

Palmer, Paul. (2004). Getting to Zero Waste. California: Purple Sky Press.

Platt, Brenda. Seldman, Neil. (2000). Wasting and Recycling in the United States 2000. Grass Roots Recycling Network. Retrieved from http://www.grrn.org/assets/pdfs/wasting/WRUS.pdf

A Visionary Goal
Ferrell, John. (2002). George Washington Carver and Henry Ford: Pioneers of Zero Waste. Retrieved from http://www.zerowaste.org/publications/PIONEERS.PDF

Kingwell, Mark. (1999). Better Living: In pursuit of happiness from Plato to Prozac. Penguin Books. Canada.

Palmer, Paul. (2004). Getting to Zero Waste. California: Purple Sky Press.

Platt, Brenda. Seldman, Neil. (2000). Wasting and Recycling in the United States 2000. GrassRoots Recycling Network. Retrieved from http://www.grrn.org/assets/pdfs/wasting/WRUS.pdf

Leonard, Annie. (2010). The Story of Stuff. Free Press. New York.

McDonough, William & Branugart, Michael. (2002). Cradle to Cradle. North Point Press. New York.

Montague, Peter. (n.d.). What is Zero Waste. GrassRoots Recycling Network. Retrieved from http://www.grrn.org/page/what-zero-waste

World Wildlife Fund. (1991). Getting at the Source: Strategies for Reducing Municipal Solid Waste. The final report of the Strategies for Source Reduction Steering Committee. Washington, DC: World Wildlife Fund & The Conservation Foundation.

What Is Waste?
Davies, Anna R. (2008). The Geographies of Garbage Governance: Interventions, Interactions and Outcomes. England: Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

EPA. (2010b). MSW Characterization Methodology. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/osw/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/06numbers.pdf

Knapp, Dan & Van Deventer, Mary Lou. (n.d.). How to Design Total Recycling Systems. GrassRoots Recycling Network. Retrieved from http://archive.grrn.org/zerowaste/total_recycling_systems.html

Leonard, Annie. (2010). The Story of Stuff. Free Press. New York.

McDonough, William & Branugart, Michael. (2002). Cradle to Cradle. North Point Press. New York.

Palmer, Paul. (2004). Getting to Zero Waste. California: Purple Sky Press.

Pillsbury, Hope. (1997, September). Setting the Standard for Recycling Measurement. Resource Recycling. Republished by EPA. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/tools/recmeas/docs/article1.htm

Urban Ore. (n.d.3) Zero Waste Resources. Retrieved from http://urbanore.com/zero-waste-resources/

Avoiding Waste
McDonough, William & Branugart, Michael. (2002). Cradle to Cradle. North Point Press. New York.

World Wildlife Fund. (1991). Getting at the Source: Strategies for Reducing Municipal Solid Waste. The final report of the Strategies for Source Reduction Steering Committee. Washington, DC: World Wildlife Fund & The Conservation Foundation.

Kharbanda, O.P., Stallworth, E.A. (1990). Waste Management: Towards a Sustainable Society. Auburn House. New York.

Palmer, Paul. (2004). Getting to Zero Waste. California: Purple Sky Press

Need For Redesign and the Precautionary Principle

McDonough, William & Branugart, Michael. (2002). Cradle to Cradle. North Point Press. New York.

Leonard, Annie. (2010). The Story of Stuff. Free Press. New York.

Commission of the European Communities. (2003, May 27). Communication from the Commission. Towards a thematic strategy on the prevention and recycling of waste. Brussels.

Ferrell, John. (2002). George Washington Carver and Henry Ford: Pioneers of Zero Waste. Retrieved from http://www.zerowaste.org/publications/PIONEERS.PDF

Ford, Henry. Crowther, Samuel. (1926). Great To-Day and Greater Future. Cosimo Inc. New York.

The Principle of Highest and Best Use
Coleman-Jensen, Alisha. Nord, Mark. Andrews, Margaret & Carlson, Steven. (2011, September). Household Food Security in the United States in 2010. ERR-125, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Econ. Res. Serv.

McDonough, William & Branugart, Michael. (2002). Cradle to Cradle. North Point Press. New York.

Palmer, Paul. (2004). Getting to Zero Waste. California: Purple Sky Press.